Anti-Wimp: Alleged burglar held for police at gunpoint

According to KCBD-TV, “It happened around 7:30 a.m. at Jake’s Construction in … [Lubbock]. “The owner of the business said the building owner encountered the burglar as he was about to steal a trailer with a welder and two toolboxes inside. It was overall worth $5,000. “The building owner then held the burglar in his […]
Source: Pratt on Texas


After Her Special Needs Son Came Home With Broken Thumbs, Review Revealed ‘More Than Heart Can Bear’

Breggett Rideau is a mother on a mission.

Rideau is understandably protective of her son, Terrance, who has special needs, so when she heard what had happened to him at the hands of a Texas teacher, she had no choice but to take action.

She tells Independent Journal Review that Terrance came home from Keller Middle School in 2008 with severe injuries:

“He came home with knot on [his] head, then he had two dislocated knees and then got a broken thumb, all from when he was at school.”

Image Credit: Breggett Rideau

Image Credit: Breggett Rideau/Independent Journal Review

Rideau pulled her son out of the school and demanded an investigation into the matter.

A few years later, she says the investigation revealed more than her heart could bear.

Names had been left out of the court’s paperwork in an attempt to protect people’s rights and privacy.

But after hearing about the horrific findings, Rideau met one-on-one with the school’s attorney to reveal the names of the case — to her dismay, Terrance’s name came up a few times:

“That’s how I found out that my son was the one who was kicked across a classroom by his teacher, yelled at to ‘shut up’ and slammed against a wall.

What’s more disturbing is the man that hurt my son had been in our home, to his BIRTHDAY party. All of this had been reported by a teachers’ aide, but no one ever called me. That’s when I said, ‘I’m going to court and we’re getting cameras in these classrooms.’”

And so the legal battle began.

Rideau explains that she didn’t really know where to start. So she started by testifying in court about what had happened to her son, something she says was “painful” as she relived every time her son was abused.

She also wrote petitions and says she “harassed” lawmakers to create a law requiring special needs classrooms in Texas to have video cameras to prevent this from happening to anyone else.

The determined mom tells us that she’s a Democrat, but then-Senator Dan Patrick, a Republican, became her son’s knight in shining armor.

Image Credit: Briggette Rideau

Image Credit: Briggette Rideau/Independent Journal Review

She explains:

“Texas has legislative sessions every two years. In 2013 I testified and Sen. Patrick wrote a camera bill. I had harassed Gov. Rick Perry, too. I put some musicians on a bus and two other families like mine, picketed in front of capital for this bill to become a law.

I was so hurt when the bill failed, but Mr. Patrick made me a promise. He’s a Republican and I’m a Democrat, but he promised me he’d get the bill passed and he kept his word. He saved my life and saved my family.”

It might have taken her seven years, but with the help of a New York lobbyist she hired, fundraising and even the use of her life savings, Rideau finally got what she had been fighting for last June, when Senate Bill 507 was signed into law by Gov. Greg Abbott (R).

According to teachthevote.org, the new law requires of all Texas school districts:

Audio/video monitoring equipment in any self-contained classroom in which special education services are being provided to at least 50 percent of the students for at least 50 percent of the school day. The requirement is triggered in the event that a parent, school board member, or staff member on the campus requests that audio/video monitoring equipment be installed. The bill also requires school districts to store the audio and video recordings for not less than six months and to release the footage to persons specified by the bill.

Additionally, the bill specifies that districts may accept donations and grant money to fund the purchase of equipment and that the commissioner of education shall provide a grant program in the event that excess Foundation School Program funds are available from the state.

Image Credit: Briggett Rideau

Image Credit: Briggett Rideau/Independent Journal Review

Today, Dan Patrick is the state’s Lieutenant Governor. Rideau says she wishes more politicians put the American people first like he did:

“That man has a good heart — I don’t know it because I heard it, I know it because I talked to him to his face and he made me a promise. And that promise, that’s decency right there.

Everyone came together to make this law possible — Republicans and Democrats worked together, that’s what America is all about. I’m so desperate for my country, but that’s the way it’s supposed to be. It’s supposed to be people coming together for the common good.”

Though she just received a letter in the mail that her son’s school is putting cameras in classrooms this school year, she reflects back on the hard road it took to enact change.

Rideau recalls begging God to help her:

“I never prayed so much in my life. They’re [children] the most vulnerable citizens of the U.S. — they might not be able to vote in elections, but they have the right to be safe from harm at school. For the love of God.

That school let me fight all those years and they knew that man hurt my son. That’s heartbreaking.”

When asked how Terrance is doing, she said he still likes to smile, watch sports and loves to hug people. Since her son’s brain was damaged after what she calls a “bad vaccine” when he was 4 months old, he’s required more care than a typical kid.

But Terrance developed dystonia, which is “involuntary muscle contractions that cause repetitive or twisting movements,” as a result of the trauma he endured in the classroom, which forced Rideau to hire a full staff of nurses and caregivers.

Image Credit: Breggett Rideau

Image Credit: Breggett Rideau/Independent Journal Review

Rideau’s strength and faith have gotten her through the toughest seven years of her life. She says the key to surviving anything life throws at you is having gumption and endurance — two things she clearly has in spades.

The post After Her Special Needs Son Came Home With Broken Thumbs, Review Revealed ‘More Than Heart Can Bear’ appeared first on Independent Journal Review.

Source: Independent Journal Review


Parents’ Baby Dies While Hospitals Keep Changing His Diagnosis

Parents seem to have a sixth sense when something is wrong with their children. They’ll do anything to figure out what’s wrong.

When Nicole Thompson and Te Keepa Paraone noticed their seven-month-old son came down with a fever, a rash, and lacked movement on his right side, they immediately took him to Midland Hospital in Perth, Australia.

Image Credit: GoFundMe

Image Credit: GoFundMe

According to 9 News Perth, the staff at the hospital told Nicole and Te Keepa that their youngest son, Malaki, was simply teething and possibly suffering from a “pulled elbow.”

Nicole even admitted they were “laughed at” for being concerned for their child before the hospital sent them on their way.

The next day, Tuesday, Malaki started to vomit and his heart rate was up. This time, his parents called an ambulance and the little boy was taken to Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH).

Nicole and Te Keepa tell 9 News Perth that when Malaki arrived to the hospital, he was examined in a bathroom, on a changing table, because the hospital didn’t have any beds available. They were sent home again, this time with Panadol, better known as Tylenol.

Image Credit: GoFundMe

Image Credit: GoFundMe

On Wednesday, a general practitioner diagnosed Malaki with “a virus” and told the concerned parents that there was nothing he could do for the infant.

Unfortunately, Malaki’s health continued to decline and on Thursday, his persistent parents brought him back to PMH. This time the hospital didn’t send Malaki home. Instead, he was put into the intensive care unit (ICU).

While on life support, doctors told Nicole and Te Keepa that their son was suffering from a meningococcal virus. Nicole, Te Keepa, and their oldest son were prescribed antibiotics just in case.

However, when Malaki’s parents accused the doctors of turning them away earlier in the week, the doctors changed Malaki’s diagnosis. They said they believed the seven-month-old was actually suffering from septicemia, a common blood infection.

The following day, Malaki was taken off life support and passed away. His parents write that his death was in fact caused by the meningococcal virus.

Nicole shared her heartbreak, and her plan going forward, with 9 News Perth:

“I was hoping that when [life support] turned off that his heart would still be beating. My son was strong for four days. I’m going to be strong for him and get the justice he deserves.

Three days I tried to get him help. Three days, two hospitals, one doctor, an ambulance trip, had they done their jobs properly my son would still be here.”

The GoFundMe account was been set up in order to help the family with funeral expenses. They are still waiting for the hospital to return their son to them.

Nicole and Te Keepa vow to keep fighting for their son.

The post Parents’ Baby Dies While Hospitals Keep Changing His Diagnosis appeared first on Independent Journal Review.

Source: Independent Journal Review


George Washington University Sparks Fiery Debate After Hiring Former Al-Qaeda Recruiter

George Washington University has come under fire for the individual it just hired to help with counter-terrorism research.

The individual’s name is Jesse Morton. Morton, however, was once known as Younus Abdullah Muhammad and was a prolific recruiter for Al-Qaeda.

In an interview with CNN in 2010, Morton made it very clear where he stood on terrorizing people:

He said:

“We are commanded to terrorize the disbelievers. And this is a religion like I said. In the Koran it says very clearly in the Arabic language, iirhabuhum, this means terrorize them. It’s a command from Allah.”

Morton also founded the website Revolution Muslim, which encouraged its audience to engage in violent acts against the enemies of Islam.

Yet, free speech only went so far when Morton ended up calling for the murder of “South Park” creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. Morton, who was in Morocco at the time, was arrested and later found himself in federal court in the United States.

The FBI report on Morton reveals why he was detained:

Jesse Curtis Morton, aka Younus Abdullah Muhammed, 33, of New York City, pleaded guilty today to using his position as a leader of Revolution Muslim Organization’s Internet sites to conspire to solicit murder, make threatening communications, and use the Internet to place others in fear.

The judge overseeing Morton’s case sentenced him to 11-and-a-half years in prison, but the former Al-Qaeda recruiter only served three years. While the details of why he was released are not entirely clear, according to the Washington Post, he helped federal prosecutors to build a case against an ISIS sympathizer.

Since his imprisonment and release, Morton has renounced his old ways and said that the choices he made “sicken him.”

With the new job at George Washington University, though, there are still some concerns about Morton’s past:

According to CNN, Morton will be working at George Washington University’s Center for Homeland Security.

This marks the first time an American educational institution has given a job to an ex-terrorist to learn more about how terrorism works. However, it doesn’t mark the first time in the U.S. that a person with a very questionable past has been hired to provide expertise on a specific area of criminality.

Whatever comes of the position, Morton says he is hoping to use it as an opportunity to “make amends” for his past.

The post George Washington University Sparks Fiery Debate After Hiring Former Al-Qaeda Recruiter appeared first on Independent Journal Review.

Source: Independent Journal Review


Mom Says Preppy Killer Got More Time For Selling Drugs Than Murdering Her Daughter

Thirty years ago this week, 18-year-old Jennifer Levin’s body was found by a cyclist in New York’s Central Park.

Jennifer had been cut, bruised, strangled, and sexually assaulted, the clothing on her upper body pushed up around her neck and her skirt around her waist.

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Image Credit: Screenshot/Today

The Medical Examiner’s office ruled the cause of death as strangulation. They found her underwear 50 yards from the scene.

Nearby, watching the investigation in the cover of dark, was Robert Chambers.

Patrons at the bar where Jennifer Levin was last seen gave Chambers’s name to police—the pair had left together. They were friends, or so she thought.

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Image Credit: Screenshot/Today

Police arrested Chambers—a classically handsome, tall, uptown “Preppy” type. A trial ensued, during which Chambers changed his story many times, even claiming at one point that Jennifer had been killed accidentally after she tried to sexual assault him.

During the trial, sordid details began to emerge about Chambers’ troubled past— drug addiction, petty theft, violence, and other anti-social behavior peppered Chambers’s personal history.

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Image Credit: Screenshot/Today

Eventually Chambers was convicted, after a deadlocked jury forced prosecutors into a plea deal. Chambers pled guilty of first-degree manslaughter and one count of burglary (for an earlier incident).

He was sentenced to 5 to 15 years in prison and served all of it, but was arrested twice more after being released from prison. Both were drug charges. The second charge got him 19 years.

Speaking to “Today,” Jennifer Levin’s mother, Ellen Levin, reflected on the irony of his drug sentence versus that he served for killing her daughter:

“I thought it was outrageous that he got more time for selling drugs then he did for killing Jennifer.”

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Image Credit: Screenshot/Today

It’s been 30 years since the horrific crime that took her daughter’s life, but for Levin, it’ll always be like it happened yesterday:

“Jennifer was robbed from me. She’s never not in my thoughts.”

Levin also spoke about her disappointment in the trial, and how people were fooled by Chambers’ clean-cut good looks:

“I can imagine that there was somebody on the jury that thought he was a clean-cut young man who would never do anything like this. I think that juries don’t work all the time.”

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Image Credit: Screenshot/Today

Also speaking to “The Today Show,” Linda Fairstein, former head of the Manhattan District Attorney’s sex crimes unit who worked on the case, echoed Levin’s lament:

“The fact that the jury didn’t decide it, after the detectives and I had given them everything we could, that was a huge disappointment for me.”

In the aftermath of her daughter’s death and Chambers’s trial, Levin fought hard for the rights of sexual assault victims. Her efforts eventually resulted in a rape shield law in New York, including the right for victims to speak in court and at parole hearings. She tries to see it as some small good that may have come from Jennifer’s death:

“I hope that the history of what happened to her has in some way effected change. I hope that I was able to be a part of it, and I think there’s a lot more awareness than there was before Jen was killed.”

As for Chambers himself, now rotting away again in jail for a separate crime, Levin doesn’t concern herself with thoughts about him. She never received an apology from Chambers, and she doesn’t want one:

“I wouldn’t believe anything he would say. As far as I’m concerned, he doesn’t exist to me.”

Robert Chambers declined “Today’s” request to be interviewed for the piece.

The post Mom Says Preppy Killer Got More Time For Selling Drugs Than Murdering Her Daughter appeared first on Independent Journal Review.

Source: Independent Journal Review


Lubbock-area news for 8/31/2016

Lubbock County Sues Car Makers for Air Pollution Community Engagement Task Force to Host First Community Forum: “Lets Talk” on Sept. 1 Lubbock ISD Voters Pass Property Tax Proposal Squeal Like a Pig BBQ Takes Raider Red Meats Championship Title Mixed Reactions from Texas Tech Professors to Teaching with Campus Carry – what hubris this […]
Source: Pratt on Texas


Abilene-area news for 8/31/2016

Abilene requests proposals for new downtown hotel and ‘festival district’, Images City of Abilene addresses high water bills City demolishes house in south Abilene VIDEO Taylor County law librarian set to retire after 23 years Abilene ISD adopts new school budget Beyond the Book: McMurry McMagnet School for 5th Graders VIDEO McMurry History Professor Dr. […]
Source: Pratt on Texas


Wichita Falls-area news for 8/31/2016

City Staff to Recommend ‘Spectra’ to Manage MPEC VIDEO McNiel, Barwise adjust to influx of 700 sixth-graders Wichita County’s regional CPS director given no reason for firing MSU dining hall renovations still incomplete MSU: Tau Sigma mixer uses Scavify to get students ‘out of the house’ MSU’ Ladd ‘off to the mountains’ for retirement MSU […]
Source: Pratt on Texas


15 People Who Stand For The National Anthem and Should Put Colin Kaepernick to Shame

Colin Kaepernick decided not to stand for the National Anthem causing a political firestorm this week. Few support the move, most think it was childish and disrespectful, including his former teammates and a chorus of fellow NFL players.

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There are some who don’t take standing for the National Anthem so lightly.

1. Like members of the Wounded Warrior softball team stand for the National Anthem.

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 03: Members of the Washington Nationals Wounded Warrior softball team observe the national anthem before the start of the Wounded Warrior Amputee Celebrity Softball Classic at Nationals Park April 3, 2012 in Washington, DC. With a team comprised of veterans and active duty service members from across the United States who lost limbs while serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, members of the Washington Nationals Wounded Warrior softball team travel the country competing against able-bodied opponents. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images

This team is comprised of Iraq or Afghanistan veterans who lost limbs while serving.

WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 03: Members of the Washington Nationals Wounded Warrior softball team observe the national anthem before the start of the Wounded Warrior Amputee Celebrity Softball Classic at Nationals Park April 3, 2012 in Washington, DC. With a team comprised of veterans and active duty service members from across the United States who lost limbs while serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, members of the Washington Nationals Wounded Warrior softball team travel the country competing against able-bodied opponents. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images

2. U.S. Army 1st Lt. Melissa Stockwell stands for the National Anthem.

NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 16: Paratriathlete Melissa Stockwell onstage during the 34th annual Salute to Women In Sports Awards at Cipriani, Wall Street on October 16, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for the Women's Sports Foundation)

Image Credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images

She was the first female American soldier to lose a limb in the Iraq war.

LOS ANGELES, CA - JULY 13: Olympic swimmer Melissa Stockwell arrives at The 2011 ESPY Awards at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on July 13, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

She recited the Pledge of Allegiance during the opening ceremony of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

DALLAS, TX - APRIL 25: U.S. Army 1st Lt. Melissa Stockwell (Ret.) (R), who was the first female American soldier to lose a limb in the war in Iraq, recites the Pledge of Allegiance as (L-R) former U.S. first lady Barbara Bush, former President George H.W. Bush, former President George W. Bush and former first lady Laura Bush look on during the opening ceremony of the George W. Bush Presidential Center April 25, 2013 in Dallas, Texas. The Bush library, which is located on the campus of Southern Methodist University, with more than 70 million pages of paper records, 43,000 artifacts, 200 million emails and four million digital photographs, will be opened to the public on May 1, 2013. The library is the 13th presidential library in the National Archives and Records Administration system. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

3. Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth stands for the National Anthem.

CHARLOTTE, NC - SEPTEMBER 04: Illinois nominee for Congress Tammy Duckworth leaves the stage after speaking during day one of the Democratic National Convention at Time Warner Cable Arena on September 4, 2012 in Charlotte, North Carolina. The DNC that will run through September 7, will nominate U.S. President Barack Obama as the Democratic presidential candidate. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Duckworth was deployed to Iraq as an Army helicopter pilot in 2004. The Black Hawk she was piloting was shot down by insurgents, and Tammy lost both of her legs.

WASHINGTON - MARCH 11: L. Tammy Duckworth, Assistant Secretary for Public and Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Veterans Affairs, arrives at a World War II Memorial ceremony to pay tribute to World War II veterans of the Pacific on March 11, 2010 in Washington, DC. Duckworth is an Iraq war veteran who lost both her legs in combat. HBO is premiering this month a ten part miniseries "The Pacific," based on the true stories of World War II Marines who fought in the Pacific Theater. (Photo by Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Duckworth has spent the last few years in Congress, standing up for veterans’ issues.

The prosthetic legs of Iraqi war veteran Tammy Duckworth, Illinois State Director of Veterans Affairs, as she walks with US President Elect Barack Obama (not pictured) before they placed a wreath at The Bronze Soldiers Memorial in honor of Veteran's Day November 11, 2008 on the Lakefront in Chicago, Illinois. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

4. U.S. D-Day veterans Frederick Carrier, 89, and Raymond Sylvester, 94, still stand for the National Anthem.

UTAH BEACH, FRANCE - JUNE 05: U.S. D-Day veterans Frederick Carrier (L), 89, and Raymond Sylvester, 94, listen to the playing of the U.S. national anthem at the U.S. D-Day Ceremony on June 5, 2014 at Utah Beach, France. Friday the 6th of June is the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings that saw 156,000 troops from the Allied countries, including the United Kingdom and the United States, join forces to launch an audacious attack on the beaches of Normandy, these assaults are credited with the eventual defeat of Nazi Germany. A series of events commemorating the 70th anniversary are planned for the week with many heads of state travelling to the famous beaches to pay their respects to those who lost their lives. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

5. Members of the U.S. wounded warrior volleyball team stand for the National Anthem.

Former US President George W. Bush (C) arrives to watch a demonstration of sitting volleyball before meeting with wounded warriors and veteran competitors at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum on December 3, 2015, in New York. The veterans are training in hopes of representing their countries at the 2016 Invictus Games in Orlando, Florida. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

This team of veterans went on to win gold at the Invictus Games.

Former US President George W. Bush (R) arrives to watch a demonstration of sitting volleyball before meeting with wounded warriors and veteran competitors at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum on December 3, 2015, in New York. The veterans are training in hopes of representing their countries at the 2016 Invictus Games in Orlando, Florida. AFP PHOTO / TIMOTHY A. CLARY / AFP / TIMOTHY A. CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

6. Todd Reed stands for the National Anthem.

Ball Boy, Todd Reed, 53, works a doubles match during the 2014 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on August 30, 2014 in New York. Reed is the the oldest ball boy at the US Open. He is a war veteran and an amputee, who lost part of his right leg after a land mine explosion in Iraq during the first Gulf War. AFP PHOTO/Kena Betancur (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images

Reed lost part of his right leg after a land mine explosion during the Gulf War.

Ball Boy, Todd Reed, 53, works a doubles match during the 2014 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on August 30, 2014 in New York. Reed is the the oldest ball boy at the US Open. He is an Iraq war veteran, who lost part of his right leg after a land mine explosion during the first Gulf War. AFP PHOTO/Kena Betancur (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images

At age 53, Reed now serves as the oldest ball boy at the U.S. Open.

Ball Boy, Todd Reed, 53, works a doubles match during the 2014 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on August 30, 2014 in New York. Reed is the the oldest ball boy at the US Open. He is an Iraq war veteran, who lost part of his right leg after a land mine explosion during the first Gulf War. AFP PHOTO/Kena Betancur (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images

7. Members of the 29th Infantry Division who landed at Omaha Beach still stand for the National Anthem.

 

VIERVILLE-SUR-MER, FRANCE - JUNE 04: World War two veterans and members of the 29th Infantry Division who landed at Omaha Beach salute during the playing of the U.S. national anthem at a ceremony honoring the sacrifices of the 29th Infantry Division June 4, 2014 in Vierville-Sur-Mer, France. June 6th is the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings which saw 156,000 troops from the allied countries including the United States and the United Kingdom join forces to launch an attack on the beaches of Normandy, these assaults are credited with the eventual defeat of Nazi Germany. A series of events commemorating the 70th anniversary is planned for the week with many heads of state travelling to the famous beaches to pay their respects to those who lost their lives. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images

8. WWII veteran Bob Dole still stands at 93 years old.

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 02: Former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole (R-KS) (C) lays a wreath during an event to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Allied Forces Victory in the Pacific and the end of World War II September 2, 2015 at the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC. The World War II effective came to an end in August, 1945, after Japanese forces surrendered to the forces of the Allied Powers. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

9. Those who may not have been treated with the most respect by their country still stand.

WASHINGTON, : Vietnam veterans Marion H. Edmonds Jr. (R) of Virginia and Joseph McLean Jr. (C) of Maryland pay their respects at the women's Vietnam memorial statue 11 November in Washington, DC. Hundreds of US military veterans came to Washington to pay their respects during the Veteran's Day observance. AFP PHOTO Stephen JAFFE (Photo credit should read STEPHEN JAFFE/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: STEPHEN JAFFE/AFP/Getty Images

10. In an Illinois veterans home, William Rexroat, a World War II Navy veteran, is working to stand again.

QUINCY, IL - FEBRUARY 17: Shirley Gooding (L), a physical therapy aid, helps William Rexroat (C), a World War II Navy veteran, exercise during a therapy session as Charles Melvin Roberts, a World War II Army veteran, waits his turn at the Quincy Veterans Home February 17, 2005 in Quincy, Illinois. The home, with its 683 beds, is the largest and oldest of four veteran's nursing homes in Illinois. The federal budget, as currently proposed by the Bush Administration, seeks to reduce the number of residents nationwide in these facilities from 38,000 to 33,000. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images

So is Leonard Nelson, a World War II Army Air Corp veteran.

QUINCY, IL - FEBRUARY 17: Leonard Nelson, a World War II Army Air Corp veteran, works out on the parallel bars during a physical therapy session at the Quincy Veterans Home February 17, 2005 in Quincy, Illinois. The home, with its 683 beds, is the largest and oldest of four veteran's nursing homes in Illinois. The federal budget, as currently proposed by the Bush Administration, seeks to reduce the number of residents nationwide in these facilities from 38,000 to 33,000. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images

11. WWII veteran Richard Overton still stands at 110 years old.

ARLINGTON, VA - NOVEMBER 11: (AFP OUT) Richard Overton (C), 107 years-old, who is believed to be America's oldest living veteran is acknowledged by U.S. President Barack Obama during a ceremony to honor veterans at the Tomb of the Unknowns on Veterans Day at Arlington National Cemetery on November 11, 2013 in Arlington, Virginia. For Veterans Day, President Obama is paying tribute to military veterans past and present who have served and sacrificed their lives for their country. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

Overton enlisted in the Army in September of 1942 and served in Guam, Palau and Iwo Jima.

ARLINGTON, VA - NOVEMBER 11: (AFP OUT) Richard Overton , 107 years-old, who is believed to be America's oldest living veteran attends a ceremony to honor veterans at the Tomb of the Unknowns on Veterans Day at Arlington National Cemetery on November 11, 2013 in Arlington, Virginia. For Veterans Day, President Obama is paying tribute to military veterans past and present who have served and sacrificed their lives for their country. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images

He stands, but he also smokes cigars and fires a tommy gun.

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Image Credit: Reddit

12. The Queen of England stands for our National Anthem.

WASHINGTON - MAY 07: U.S. President George W. Bush (R) and HRH Queen Elizabeth II stand side-by-side during the playing of the American national anthem on the South Lawn of the White House May 7, 2007 in Washington, DC. Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh are on a six day trip to the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

13. So does the Pope.

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 23: Pope Francis (R) and U.S. President Barack Obama (L) stand for the national anthem of the Holy See during the arrival ceremony at the White House on September 23, 2015 in Washington, DC. The Pope begins his first trip to the United States at the White House followed by a visit to St. Matthew's Cathedral, and will then hold a Mass on the grounds of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images

14. Watch Usain Bolt, who is from Jamaica, stop and stand for our National Anthem.

15. And then there is Frank Levingston. At 110 years old, he is believed to be the oldest living World War II veteran.

Frank Levingston of Lake Charles, Louisiana, who is believed to be the oldest living World War II veteran at 110 years old, attends a ceremony marking the 74th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC, December 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

On a chilly autumn day in 2015, Levingston visited the memorial built in his honor for the first time.

WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 07: Frank Levingston, who at 110-years-old is believed to be the oldest living World War II veteran, is escorted to a wreath laying ceremony at the World War II Memorial marking the attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 2015 in Washington, DC. More than 2,400 Americans lost their lives in the surprise attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy and the attack forced the United States into World War II. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Win McNamee/Getty Images

Levingston can no longer stand, but he still proudly waved his flag.

Frank Levingston of Lake Charles, Louisiana, who is believed to be the oldest living World War II Veteran at 110 years old, attends a ceremony marking the 74th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, at the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC, December 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Instead, everyone else stood for Levingston.

People greet Frank Levingston (R) of Lake Charles, Louisiana, who is believed to be the oldest living World War II veteran at 110 years old, as he attends a ceremony marking the 74th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, at the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC, December 7, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

Every American has the right to stand, or not stand, during the playing of our National Anthem. We are a free people.

Supporters of the United States sing the national anthem as they wait for the start of the Copa America Centenario football tournament match against Paraguay in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, on June 11, 2016. / AFP / NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

But here is why you should stand when the National Anthem plays:

LAKE BUENA VISTA, FLORIDA - MAY 12: United States wheelchair bsketball team players celebrates during the Wheelchair Basketball Finals medals ceremony at te Invictus Games Orlando at the ESPN Wide World of Sports complex on May 12, 2016 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. United States won the gold medal after defeating United Kingdom. (Photo by Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games)

Image Credit: Gerardo Mora/Getty Images for Invictus Games

To respect those who stood up for us.

WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 22: In this White House handout, U.S. President George W. Bush (L) stands next to with U.S. Army Cpl. Shane Parsons of Fostoria, Ohio during a visit to Walter Reed Army Medical Center as first lady Laura Bush (2nd L) and Cordero's mother, Rosa watch December 22, 2006, in Washigton, DC. (Photo by Eric Draper/White House via Getty Images)

Image Credit: Eric Draper/White House/Getty Images

Stand for those who sacrificed their ability to stand.

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 31: David Lish, who is not a Vietnam War veteran, takes rubbings of names of friends from the Vietnam Memorial wall in Washington, 31 May 1999. Many people, including those like Lish who participated in the Rolling Thunder motocycle rally, visited The Wall on Memorial Day to honor the soldiers. AFP PHOTO George BRIDGES (Photo credit should read GEORGE BRIDGES/AFP/Getty Images)

Image Credit: GEORGE BRIDGES/AFP/Getty Images

And those who sacrificed so much more.

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 11: (EDITORS NOTE: THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN CONVERTED TO BLACK AND WHITE) A competitor watches the action during the Invictus Games athletics at Lee Valley on September 11, 2014 in London, England.The International sports event for 'wounded warriors', presented by Jaguar Land Rover was an idea developed by Prince Harry after he visited the Warrior Games in Colorado USA. The four day event has brought together thirteen teams from around the world to compete in nine events such as wheelchair basketball and sitting volleyball. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Image Credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images

The post 15 People Who Stand For The National Anthem and Should Put Colin Kaepernick to Shame appeared first on Independent Journal Review.

Source: Independent Journal Review


Mom of Son Killed by Illegal Immigrant Hangs Hillary Out to Dry Over ‘Amnesty’ Plan

Julie Golvach’s 25-year-old son was murdered by a man who was not only in the country illegally, but was a career criminal, drug dealer, federal prisoner and gang banger who had been deported four times. 

As such, she’s very interested in what the presidential candidates’ immigration policies are.

Golvach told Fox and Friends that Hillary Clinton has been contacted by her and a group called Angel Moms to discuss immigration policies, but has never responded.

She claimed that “the policies that have continued in this country for years” are to blame for her son’s murder. And she characterized Mrs. Clinton’s policies on her campaign website as nothing more than “amnesty” for people who have broken the law to break into the country:

“She’s going to allow amnesty for the first 100 days. I think it would be detrimental to this country if she actually becomes president.”

Mrs. Clinton’s immigration plan starts with these words:

“Hillary will introduce comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to full and equal citizenship within her first 100 days in office.”

Golvach told Fox and Friends that she is looking forward to Trump’s upcoming speech on immigration and wants to see four policy objectives articulated:

“I want to hear him continue to stay on message, that he’s going to secure the border, that he’s going to enforce the laws – which includes E-Verify, not allowing sanctuary cities and having law enforcement turn over illegal aliens to ICE.”

Golvach says Donald Trump did get in touch with her and has given a willing ear to the parents of loved ones killed by illegal immigrants.

The post Mom of Son Killed by Illegal Immigrant Hangs Hillary Out to Dry Over ‘Amnesty’ Plan appeared first on Independent Journal Review.

Source: Independent Journal Review